Building Bridges Building a Future

I first met Karen Taylor Richardson at a local ACFW meeting. Her area of expertise fits nicely into my theme of Connections–so of course I asked her to contribute. Bridge-building is a well known and respected principle in the business world. You never know when that one connection will create the perfect bridge for your career advancement. I hope you enjoy her post.

One piece of advice many young people receive as they venture into the working world is “no matter what, don’t burn your bridges”.  Bridges connect people to one another. As careers are built, as are bridges, it is the manner in which we handle events or opportunities that lead us from one job to the next – from the mail room to the executive suite. Maybe somewhere in the middle is the best fit. Along the way, relationships are created that will connect us to future opportunities.
The foundation for your bridge is your reputation. Are you seen by others as credible and responsible? The stronger both of these are, the stronger the connection.
Reputations with others are built over time and by consistently showing who you are as a person. Your character, work-ethic and beliefs are demonstrated not only in what you say, but your reactions to all kinds of circumstances. For the believer, the way we handle work situations is often an extension of our faith. It’s God-honoring to put in a good day’s work and be seen as credible, responsible and hard-working.
I started my professional career in 1991. A few years out of college, a shiny Bachelor’s degree, ready to climb the corporate ladder. Back in the early ninety’s we still used classified ads and cold calling to look for jobs. It was agonizing! One method we used still stands true today –networking. Who do you know that can connect you with someone hiring?
A friend of mine who knew my skills and work ethic, gave my resume to the hiring manager for a position I was interested in.  I had two interviews and got the job.  His referral got me the interview. My answers to the questions got me the job.
That first position, along with my reputation and the relationships I built led to my next several positions. You see, the career journey for me hasn’t been about one place, one culture, one ladder to climb; it’s been about connecting with others at work, in the community and church in a manner that has built a reputation of working hard and being credible. 
In 2011, for the first time in over 20 years, I found myself unemployed. To put it kindly, I was restructured out. The whole nightmare was riddled with dirty politics. I don’t play those games. Looking back now, I can see where God held me up and gave me strength to take the high ground. The ordeal was a punch to my professional confidence and ego. I hadn’t looked for a job since 1991. Needless to say the methods for job hunting had changed. But one thing had stayed the same – the personal connection. Updating my resume, I did the 21st century thing and posted it online. But then I went “old school” and started to make phone calls to people and mentors to let them know I was on the job market.
Every person I called was willing to help. God had something better in mind. I ended up self-employed but my largest client came from someone I knew 10 years ago who made sure my name was on the top of the interview list. Ten years is a long time, but the reputation and connection I built then, made all the difference when I needed it most; he would have never helped me had I not been worthy of him putting his name on the line and make the referral.
Job hunting today is extremely competitive, online applications make it easy to job hunt all hours of the day and night from anywhere. But absolutely nothing compares to the personal touch – one person connecting another. It’s these connections that turn a flat piece of paper, into a living, breathing person.
About the Author: Karen Taylor-Richardson is a communications strategist who continues to learn about the craft of writing. In 2009, she started her blog, KKs Candor, www.kkscandor.com. Karen enjoys reading and gardening. She lives in Louisville, Kentucky with her husband and son.




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Growing Connections

I first met Ralene Burke via the ACFW regional page on Facebook, but I think I’d seen her before. According to her article below, we were both in Denver at the 2009 ACFW conference. I can’t imagine being in the same room with Ralene and not noticing her. Her bright personality is hard to miss. After relocating to the Louisville area, she set a date for a meeting and several writers gathered. We’ve been meeting once a month, ever since that day, picking up more members as we go. Her fresh ideas keep us coming back for more. So of course, I had to ask Ralene to share her take on Connections for this month’s theme on my blog. I hope you enjoy the post!

Ralene: When your parents tell you that you can be anything when you grow up, that leaves a whole wide world of choices for the young mind. As a young woman, fresh out of high school, I was ready to tackle the world. Or so I thought. 

For several years, I stumbled about, trying to find my place. I floated from job to job. Sure, I excelled at whatever I put my mind to, but I wasn’t happy. Satisfaction eluded me. I wasn’t doing what I was supposed to be doing.

While I was working at a bank, I had a chance encounter that included my high school bus driver and my teller supervisor. The result was this brilliant (yeah, not so much) idea for a novel. So, in my free time, I started writing. Over the next few months, I continued to work on the story in bits and pieces. I was even brave enough to let a fellow bank employee read it. 


In February 2006, my husband returned home from deployment, and we moved to Texas. I went from working full time and going out with friends to being a stranger in a strange land: a stay-at-home mom with a newborn with no local friends. Aaaah!

But, the new freedom gave me more time to write. I really didn’t know much about writing or publishing, and I wanted to learn. So I joined Writing.Com (free basic account, which I later upgraded) and found a forum for YA novelists. This group became my source of growth and encouragement. I’m friends with many of them still today.

A year or so later, I joined American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) and immediately got involved! I took the free courses and participated in the loops. When I was eligible, I even became one of the Zone Directors. In 2009, I went to my very first writing conference: ACFW in Denver, CO. I thought it would be awkward, not knowing anyone, but it turns out I knew more than I thought. Of course, my critique partner was there, but so were several members from my zone, whom I had communicated with and gotten to know online. 

It was about this time that I started getting into Facebook and blogging. Here was an opportunity to connect with even more writers. Even more homeschoolers. More people to encourage and support, and in whom to find the same. 

Today, as a writer and homeschooler, I find that my life can get rather hermit-esque. All too often, the day-to-day stress (and joys) of working from home while educating my kids can get to me. It’s nice to have found fellow writers who understand my journey. It’s a joy to know that I can reach out to other homeschoolers when I am ready to tear my hair out. And those rare few who write and homeschool? Well, they completely get me.

I’ve finally found my place. It took a few years, a few wrong turns, and a multitude of prayers, but I’ve made it. And God provided me with the support He knew I would need. 

About the Author:Whether Ralene Burke is wielding a writer’s pen, an editor’s sword, or a social media wand, she always has her head in a dreamer’s world. And she wants to make it SHINE! In her own writing, she spins fast-paced tales of fantasy worlds, angels and demons, and the broader calling of every human being. A place where the light pierces the darkness . . . You can find out more about her writing and editing services on her website: http://www.raleneburke.com

Writerly Connections

I haven’t really gone fishing. Not in the usual sense. 

As a writer, I need to make connections. One of the best ways to do that, is to attend conferences. You meet all sorts of people at writers conferences. Of course you meet lots of writers from the novice to the expert, unpublished, published, multi-published. You meet agents, editors, publishers, teachers, speakers, and everything in between.

I attended my first writers conference in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, several years ago. Excited and more than a little nervous, I walked into a classroom and sat down. After it started, I realized I was in the wrong class, but the speaker was so funny and interesting, I decided to stay. And besides, there was chocolate.

After that, I attended every class she taught. Ginny Smith, author of numerous novels in several genres, became my first “writerly” connection. Ginny encouraged me to keep working. She suggested I join a writing organization that offered critique loops where I could meet other beginning writers and improve my craft.

But most important of all, Ginny became a friend. There were others along the way, who also encouraged me to keep working at my writing. I met Fay Lamb on the main critique loop at ACFW. She encouraged me to form my own group, where I met my long-time crit partner, Amy Blake.

After a while, Amy got busy with home-schooling and other responsibilities, and had to move on. I joined two other small groups and met Nike Chillemi and Jennifer Hallmark. Nike (AKA Crime Fictionista) is a constant encourager, and in return, I get to read her crime/suspense stories in progress. Jennifer and I work together on a blog she started with another of our critique loop members, Christina Rich (Writing Prompts & Thoughts & Ideas…Oh My!).

As I got to know Fay Lamb better, we discovered so many “odd” coincidences in our lives, we’ve decided we’re long-lost siblings. And yes, “odd” is the correct word. She even named her latest dog “Audrey.” Another weird coincidence, since my middle name is Audrie. By the time many of you read this post, I hope to have met Fay, face-to-face for the first time. Ever. But we have so much in common, will it seem we’ve known each other much longer?

Fay linked me up with Tracy Ruckman of Write Integrity Press. I was invited to contribute to a multi-author novella published this past February–A Dozen Apologies–a humorous “caper” of a romance. Jennifer Hallmark also worked on that novella. What fun we had. I’ll also meet Tracy this weekend. Later this year, Write Integrity Press will publish my novel, Amelia’s Legacy, the first of three in the Legacy Series.

At a local gathering of authors, I met Hallee Bridgeman and her husband, Gregg. Hallee is busy making quite a splash in the Indie publishing market. I had self-published a couple of fantasy-adventure novels several years ago. They lacked “pizazz” — Hallee and Gregg helped me get them spruced up. I’m working on some final details that will (huge sigh of relief) make me proud of those two books. I could not have done this on my own. God knows exactly what we need, and when we need it. Along comes the connection at the precise moment of need.

Are you beginning to see the pattern here? Of connections made over the years, one after another? Though many times, I’ve been tempted to give up, I kept moving forward, and now I’m a published author. I’m still attending conferences, because you still need to make those connections.

I have worldwide connections now, as my connections multiply.

We cross-publicize, pray for one another, encourage one another in the craft of writing and in life. What greater pleasure is there? So dear reader, are you discouraged, thinking you’ll never make it? Have you done everything possible to improve your craft? Have you put yourself out there? Found and attended local groups and conferences?

Life is a series of connections, both public and private, whatever field or calling is yours. Where you are right now came as a result of some sort of connection.

I thank God for all my connections. I’ve met wonderful people along the way, who took the time to express encouragement to a newbie. I learned from some of the best among them. Never forget, you may be someone else’s most important connection.

“Agree with each other, love each other, be deep-spirited friends. Don’t push your way to the front; don’t sweet-talk your way to the top. Put yourself aside, and help others get ahead. Don’t be obsessed with getting your own advantage. Forget yourselves long enough to lend a helping hand.” Philippians 2: 2-4, The Message

photo credit: Sifter via photopin cc

A Connect – Disconnect Connection

This month is all about connections here on my blog. It’s really a celebration of connections. You know those unexpected, surprise connections that result in life changes? There are good ones, and there are bad ones.

For instance, a good friend in Louisville invited me to spend Labor Day Weekend with her. I was living out of state at the time, so drove in. While there, I received a lead on a job, and met my future husband.

That was a “Connect – Disconnect Connection.” I connected with an old friend, met a new friend and my life changed course. By the end of the year, I was married and working at that new job.

Things don’t always happen so fast, and they are not always positive. Some disconnects include death, divorce, and disease/illness (the 3 D’s). Sometimes, even these devastating disconnects can result in positive changes.

I’m still married, but that job went away when I made a new connection, in the form of a brand new baby boy. He was a definite life change. Another connect – disconnect.

The husband, the new baby, and me – way back when…

Not long afterwards, I was walking down the hall on my way out of church, when I was “accosted” by a stranger who began to kiss my brand new baby all over his face. Don’t be alarmed, Anita Edmonds was the wife of our new youth pastor, and soon became one of my closest friends. A lasting connection.The best kind.

Friendships are often the connects that last longest. And many gain their best life opportunities through friends. A little later this month, I’ll talk about some of these connections. The ones I’ve made as I started my writer’s journey. I’m going to drop a few names in that post. Maybe yours will be there. I’ve made a lot of friends since starting down this road. Folks traveling the same route with similar life experiences are often bound together in friendship–a sense of “kinship”–because we understand, better than anyone.

Think about a time in your life, you made a positive connect – disconnect connection. Consider how it changed your life for the better–set you on a new road. It may have been your marriage, or your education, your occupation, or even your encounter with God. I would love for you to share that moment if you have the time, in our comment section.

I’ve got a couple of guests stopping by later this month to share their experience with connections. I hope you’ll stop back in to read what they have to say. And, as always, thanks for stopping by.