Another Meet-Cute Adventure

MomandDad
My Mom & Dad

After I posted Book o’ My Heart, with the story about my parents (pictured here), I received a comment from a friend telling me of her parents’ similar experience. This involves someone who was very important in my life–my pastor during my teens and early adulthood. He presided over my wedding and witnessed many important events in my and my parents’ lives. He and his first wife and my parents had a lot in common. I wanted to share it with you as a follow-up to the earlier post.


When I read Betty’s blog recounting the “meet-cute” story of her parents’ relationship, it reminded me so much of my own parents’ story! My father was raised on a farm in middle Tennessee with no electricity or indoor plumbing. He always says they did have running water, because his mother would say, “Roy, run down to the creek and get some water!”

My mother was a small-town Kentucky girl. She was voted football queen, won state awards in Glee Club, and had a large group of girl and boy friends. After his military service, Dad attended Murray College to study to be a minister. One day he was walking across campus and saw my mother standing in a line. He says he knew at that moment she was his wife. He wasn’t sure how to meet her, but when he went to the mandatory chapel, his assigned seat for the year was next to hers. I don’t think Mother had the same “this is the one” feeling that he had, but they dated steadily that semester.

Her Mom & Dad
Her Mom & Dad

Dad drove her to her home at Christmas break and met her family. However, during the break, she dated several of her former beaus, and the boys gave her wonderful Christmas presents. She told Dad she wanted to make sure he was really the one she loved! When she got back to college, Dad must have convinced her that he was “the one,” because they went to Mississippi to elope on January 6th. When Mom called her family to tell them she had gotten married, they were shocked and didn’t get all the details. They had to phone her back to find out who she had married!

Mom and Dad ministered as pastor and pastor’s wife for many years in both Kentucky and Tennessee. They were married for nearly 57 years, until my mom’s death in 2009.

Dad told the story of seeing her for the first time and knowing she was ‘the one’ many times from the pulpit. Mom would always laugh and say, “Oh Roy, you did not!” I don’t know if she ever believed it, but I do; for my Dad, it was love at first sight. –Contributed by Teresa Stanulis

TeresaLamberthTeresa Stanulis is an artist who creates with a sewing machine, embroidery machine, and knitting needles. She has an Etsy site at Stitchin’ Gal, a place you really need to visit.

Teresa is a stay-at-home mom of two sons. She’s been sewing and knitting since she was about 9 years old, and she loves fabric and yarn. In business since 2001, she makes personalized gifts for babies and for the home.

Here are a few of her creations:

StichinGalQuilt StitchinGalKnit StitchinGalBibb

Stitchin’ Gal @ Etsy


Read the story–

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Book o’ My Heart

oldtheaterMy mother and father had a “meet-cute” — an event that brings a “fated” couple together for the first time, usually in a cute, romantic way. She worked at the candy counter in a movie theater in Seattle. He was a cocky, slightly inebriated sailor, just in from Korea.

He flirted with Mom’s best friend, who already had a steady boyfriend, one who was due to walk through the door at any moment. Mom to the rescue. What are best friends for? She stepped over and distracted the handsome but too happy young sailor. Her mission accomplished, she felt pretty good. When the young sailor sobered up, he came back. Several times. And then they eloped.

They eloped all the way to Biloxi, Mississippi. At the end of Dad’s furlough, he left Mom with his family in West Tennessee. My dad was not totally honest and up front with his young bride (she was only seventeen, he was nineteen). He talked long about his home (as in long, tall tale). He told Mom that his mother and step-dad lived on a ranch in the rolling, green hills of West Tennessee. They had horses and cattle.

IMG_4622In actuality, they were sharecroppers who lived in a rickety house. The cows weren’t theirs, and the horses–work horses that pulled a plow. And that house–no indoor plumbing. A fireplace for heat. Bare bulbs hanging from the ceiling. Grandma cooked on a wood stove. And they raised cotton and corn and everything they needed to live. They worked hard all day long, every day.

No rolling, green hills either. Flat. Dirty. Muddy. Mosquitoes. Snakes. Yuck.

My Mom was from a broken home. She lived with her Mom in urban Seattle and spent summers at her Dad’s in urban L.A. They were middle class. She dressed well, ate well, and was popular in school.

Culture shock. Dad went back to the Navy. Mom stayed with his eldest sister and her husband and young daughter, in a slightly better abode closer to town. With summer came heat and humidity the likes of which, Mom had never experienced. And she was pregnant.

I’ve wanted to tell this story for a long time. I’ve wanted to write it, but each time I tried, I failed. Not long ago, after I had finished re-reading the Book of Ruth, an idea popped into my head–a “what-if.” What if this happened in more modern times. What if I set it in West Tennessee…in the 1950’s? I could combine the two stories I loved so well.

I talked about it–a lot–to everyone I knew. Mom shared more memories. My older brother (the baby in the above narrative), helped me research it. I got excited about it then sat down and began to write.

Last week, it released. Annabelle’s Ruth is that book of my heart. Inspired by the biblical Book of Ruth, and also by my mother’s early experiences.

But wait–I don’t want to leave you with a negative idea of West Tennessee. Seen through Mom’s young eyes, it was not her favorite place, but she spent most of her life there and ended up loving it. My dad could never be far away from it, especially while his mother lived. And it’s roots are deep in my heart. I don’t live there anymore. I live in Kentucky with my husband of more than forty years. I love it here, but I still like to visit West Tennessee. I have family there, and it holds precious memories of Grandma, and the aunts, and numerous cousins.

It gets under the skin of my heroine in Annabelle’s Ruth, too. She finds a reason to love it, sets down roots, and stays.

I hope you’ll love the story I’ve woven from these two threads.

If you’d like the chance to win a free copy of Annabelle’s Ruth (Kindle or print — winner’s choice), then leave me a comment here, or on my Facebook author page (you can also enter the GoodReads contest on the right).

Annabelle's Ruth FRONT final Cover