A High-Low Day

Hello, Thursday Morning! Hey, is it raining much near you? Remember earlier this year when I was all, “woe is me” over the rainy weather? Yep, you guessed it. We are in a drought in the state of Kentucky.

That’s kind of the way it rolls, isn’t it?

I’ve just returned from a too-brief visit with Mom. She lives in Lexington and she’s within half an hour of some of the most beautiful countryside around. Even in its crispy state, it’s still beautiful.

This time, we visited Wilmore, home of Asbury University, and High Bridge, home of a Victorian-era railroad bridge and park. We stood above the Kentucky River Gorge and looked far below to the green puddle of a river. I’ve never seen it so low.

I have not included the picture of Mom. She made me pinky-promise not to share it, as she is due for a haircut. But really, these photos don’t do the park justice. It was absolutely beautiful out there, and so quiet, until the train went through. Yes, the old bridge (built in1877) is still in use.

While riding in the car, Mom told me how much she’d enjoyed Annabelle’s Joy. She loved being back in the small town and remembering the folks. She could almost smell the cookies baking, along with some of the other tasty dishes they cooked back then.

She also told me about one of her favorite scenes in the book. Annabelle is uncertain why the new woman in town rankles her nerves. For months, she struggles with guilt over it. Do you know anyone like that, who grates on your nerves and you either don’t know why, or you don’t really want to contemplate why?

Here’s the scene:

The pixie sat at the well-worn, upright piano, running a lacy handkerchief over the keys. Annabelle turned her gaze away. Why did the woman rankle her so? Maybe because she was everywhere, into everything. She’d already insinuated herself into the choir, taken the pianist’s position, among other things. Of course, Hattie Overton, the former pianist, was only too happy to give it over. At ninety-two, she was ready to retire.

Annabelle had stifled a twinge of disappointment when Rosella never hit a sour note. Every song, even the most difficult came out perfectly.

It didn’t help to hear such words as “effervescent” used to describe the newcomer. Effervescent. Made her think of those seltzer tablets you used for an upset tummy. Something Annabelle could use right about now.

Thankfully, Lillian slid in beside her as the music started. Everyone stood for the Doxology. Annabelle did her best to let go of her ill feelings toward the pianist. She managed to keep her thoughts away entirely. She did not want to contemplate the reason for her attitude.

I love that scene, too, and I know the reason for her ill feelings!

Do you love an imperfect character? Do you prefer to see their character changed by end of book, or would you rather not have all the ends neatly tied?

Click-to-Tweet: At High Bridge Park in #Kentucky, we stood above the Kentucky River Gorge and looked far below to the green puddle of a river. I’ve never seen it so low. #travel

2 thoughts on “A High-Low Day

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